Chaquehue Recipe

Bowl of ChaquehueIt had probably been over 10 years since I’ve had or made Chaquehue. It’s eaten as a hot cereal, similar to cream of wheat, made with blue cornmeal. I always liked the color of it, a pastel purple. How could you not like eating something purple? I grew up on this stuff and always had a hard time finding blue corn meal locally and never really thought of getting it online. There’s a few Mexican stores near me and none of them seem to carry it. My Grandma came to my rescue this past Christmas and sent me some from Colorado where you can find it pretty easily at most grocery stores.

I had no idea how to spell it and still don’t really. When I Googled what I thought it might be there weren’t very many results and I saw a few other spellings for it too so who knows how it’s really spelled. I’ve also seen it spelled Chaquewe and Sakewe. It’s pronounced shaw que weh

I was later informed via Flickr and Facebook that Bob’s Red Mill has a blue cornmeal that you can probably find at Whole Foods and other grocery stores around town. I’ve only ever made it using the kind pictured below that’s usually found in Mexican stores. So after I run out, I may give Red Mill brand a try and see if it tastes the same. Several people were curious about the recipe so I decided to measure out the ingredients over the weekend so I can post a recipe. I’ve never measured the ingredients before, I usually just throw it all together.

Ingredients:
4 cups Cold Water
1 cup blue cornmeal
1 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
Salt to taste

Serving Size: 3-4 servings

Insructions:

1. Add cold water and blue cornmeal to a sauce pan.
2. Stir together with a wisk until boiling. (The mixture will thicken as it comes to a boil.)
3. Add milk, sugar, and a pinch of salt and wisk until combined and serve hot.

You can use less sugar and/or milk if you like but these are the measurements I used last weekend and I wouldn’t use much more sugar or milk than what I have above. You can add a little at a time until it’s the thickness and sweetness you like.

Chaquewe aka Chaquehue Harina de Atole

34 thoughts on “Chaquehue Recipe

  1. I don't think so. From what I've read atole is a drink. This is not, it's a hot cereal like a porridge. It is a little runnier in this pic than what I usually make it. I just added too much milk.

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  2. The pic and recipe is for Atole. Chaquewe is thicker, like a bread. My great-grandmother served it with beans, almost like blue cornbread but more like the texture of tamale masa.

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  3. I was missing my mother and longing for home when I remembered that I had a package of Harina Para Atole in the freezer (several years old). I was not exactly sure how my mom made it or the spelling for Chaquewe. I followed your recipe and it was just like my mom made. Thank you for posting the recipe.

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  4. Aww. I have a lot of memories of eating this stuff as a kid. Glad the recipe worked for you. I haven't had it in a long time. Need to visit a Mexican store and get some more.

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  5. This is most definitely Chaquehue. Atole is MUCH runnier. Perhaps the people who are mistaking it for atole have a different word for what the rest of the world sees as atole. Lol

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  6. This is most definitely Chaquehue. Atole is MUCH runnier. Perhaps the people who are mistaking it for atole have a different word for what the rest of the world sees as atole. Lol

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  7. My mom would make it Chaquehue: a thicker consistency and savory (my dad would add red chile on top); She made Atole: a thinner consistency with milk and sugar usually as a drink. I grew up understanding that they were both made with Blue Corn but were different depending on cooking techniques. I miss the days of my childhood. 🙂

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  8. Right, chaquegue is white flour and my mom would bring oil and water to simmer and then pour a combination of the chaquegue and water into the other simmering water. We also had it with red chile caribe, yum, Santa Fe, NM

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  9. Today I am hanging out with my Grandma in Chimayo NM and found some blue corn meal in her freezer and asked is this what you use to make atole or chaquehue? She said both if you want atole you make it thinner and add sugar and milk. If you want chaquehue your make it thicker with salt, every region is different. Chimayo is Northern New mexico between Santa Fe and Taos jist east of Espanola. If you ask someone from Mexico about atole its made with white corn meal amd chocolate made like a hot sweet drink. So I googled it and found your recipe thanks for sharing!! Happy Holidays!❤

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  10. Joy DuBoise would you use this same recipe to make chaquehue using white corn meal ? My Mom's chaquehue was not blue and I don't remember it being sweet.She put red chili sauce on top and called it dinner. Delicious

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  11. I agree with Dominic Lafayette. As a northern New Mexican native my family and I have lived here for several generations! I grew up on Atole and Chaquehue. What you are showing is Atole which is a drink. Chaquehue is white corn meal and is served warm with sugar and milk and is usually eaten for breakfast. The packaging in your picture even says \”Atole\”. Find the Atole description below: http://www.potrerotradingpost.com/OtherProduce.html

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  12. Atole is blue corn meal and chaquehue is white corn meal and I grew up on atole. My mom didn't know how to make chaquehue and if any one knows how could you share please.

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  13. I was born & raised in Albuquerque area & ancestry is Northern New Mexico. I agree Chimayo grandma that Atole is thinner(drink) than Chaquewe, but whether it is Blue or White is due whether one has Blue-Indian Corn meal(ergo New Mexico Chaquewe) & Atole (Mexican white Corn). Chaquewe is New Mexican, where food is mixture of Indian & Spanish culture foods.

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  14. Very interesting comments. So far in my experience atole was served warm with sweetener and milk. Consistency depended on person. Could drink it or eat it simular to porrage. Made of blue corn meal finely milled. Don't see reason why white corn meal can't be substituted for either. Chaquehue for me resembled polenta, which can be served savory or sweet. Yellow and blue corn meal is the easiest to find. Love polenta made with blue or yellow coarsely milled corn meal.

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  15. Chaquehue was a breakfast like oatmeal was for some folks. Serving it with red chile and some pan-fried pork made it more appetizing butnwas too much for older people and the infirm. Atole was a gruel that old people and the infirm ate to keep their nutrition up. It was given to them as a drink for breakfast and lunch or even dinner, depending on their health. It was a good source of sweet grain and good source of fiber… important to make everything move along. White corn, blue corn, doesn't matter … like everything else in life … if you can handle a little red chile … it makes everything just so much better.

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  16. My Grandma used to make me this every time I was sick. I haven’t had it since she passed away many years ago. I have an upper respiratory infection now and have been hurting, so I made myself some. I’m eating it right now. (It would be a whole lot better if I could taste it though Lol)

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  17. Thanks, for posting, I had a hard time finding the recipe on Chaquehue, and spelled it Chaquewe, so glad you included that spelling on your post! My Grandmother made it with a tablespoon of vegetable oil, cooked with all the ingredients you posted with a pinch of salt, and was made like cream of wheat, or cream of rice cereal, so the milk and sugar was put later, to taste in your cereal bowl not on the stove while cooking. I have a Salvadorean Store near me, and they sell a blue corn, looks purple, but it is so purple it looks black when cooked. It is not quite the same flavor as N.M. Blue Corn,, but close, just had some, and went online to check if I got the recipe correct. Yes!, It is a simple recipe, and always brings me back to my childhood. I’m from AZ., grandmother was from N.M., and I reside in MA.

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    1. Yeah I wasn’t able to find much out there on making this which was surprising so thought I’d post it. My recipe comes out a little thin and I should probably update it to add less water or use weight measurements instead. I’ve also found not all blue corn flour is the same. I have a hard time finding the stuff I grew up with.

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